People: Center Director and Members

The Center for Critical and Humanistic Computing is directed by Professor Shaowen Bardzell.

 

The founding members of the Center include the following:

Jeffrey Bardzell is Professor of Informatics and Director of the HCI/Design program in the School of Informatics, Computing, and Engineering and the Affiliated Faculty of the Kinsey Institute and Department of Comparative Literature at Indiana University. His research examines both design theory and emerging social computing practices. His work on design theory has focused on critical design, research through design, and design criticism. His research on emerging social computing practices includes critical-empirical studies on maker communities in the United States and Asia, intimate and sexual interaction, and online creative communities. A common thread throughout this work is the use of aesthetics—including the history of criticism, critical theory, and analytic aesthetics—to understand how concepts, materials, forms, ideologies, experiential qualities, and creative processes achieve coherence in design objects. He is co-editor of Critical Theory and Interaction Design (MIT Press, 2018) and co-author of Humanistic HCI (Morgan and Claypool Synthesis Lectures in Human-Centered Informatics).

 

Shaowen Bardzell is Professor of Informatics in the School of Informatics, Computing, and Engineering and the Affiliated Faculty of the Kinsey Institute, Department of Gender Studies, and Department of Comparative Literature at Indiana University. Bardzell holds a Ph.D. in Comparative Literature from Indiana University and pursues a humanistic research agenda within the research and practice of Human Computer Interaction (HCI). A common thread throughout her work is the exploration of the contributions of feminism, design, and social science to support technology’s role in social change. Recent research foci have included care ethics and feminist utopian perspectives on IT, research through design, women’s health, cultural and creative industries in Asia, data value and computational agriculture, and posthumanist approaches to sustainable design. Bardzell is the co-editor of Critical Theory and Interaction Design (MIT Press, 2018) and co-author of Humanistic HCI (Morgan & Claypool, 2015). She directs the Center for Critical and Humanistic Computing and co-directs the Cultural Research in Technology (CRIT) Lab at Indiana University.

 

Eli Blevis is Professor of Informatics in Human-Computer Interaction Design (HCI/d) at the School of Informatics, Computing, and Engineering (SICE) at Indiana University, Bloomington. Since 2012, he has served during summers as a Visiting Professor at the Hong Kong Polytechnic University School of Design. His primary area of research, and the one for which he is best known, is sustainable interaction design. His research also engages visual thinking—especially photographic foundations of HCI, and design theory—especially transdisciplinary design.

 

 

 

 

Norman Su is Assistant Professor in the School of Informatics, Computing, and Engineering, a faculty fellow of the Rob Kling Center for Social Informatics, and an affiliate faculty in Cognitive Science at Indiana University Bloomington. He is also an affiliated faculty member in the Institute of Software Research at the University of California, Irvine. Su directs the Authentic User Experience Lab (AUX Lab) where he and his students integrate empirical and humanistic methods in HCI to study and design with subcultures. By amplifying and predicting societal concerns and innovations, his research on subcultures envisions designs for members of marginalized and mainstream cultures. He has searched a wide range of “users”, including corporate nomadic workers, knowledge management practitioners, hardcore video gamers, hunters, minimalists, and Irish traditional musicians. His interests lie in human–computer interaction (HCI), computer–supported cooperative work (CSCW), the humanities, ubiquitous computing, organizational/management science, and science & technology studies (STS).